Posts made in March, 2016

Geopolymer cement and Geopolymer Concrete

Posted by on Mar 16, 2016 in Geopolymer News | 0 comments

Geopolymer cement and Geopolymer Concrete

Geopolymer cement and Geopolymer Concrete

Updated on Dec 7, 2015

Geopolymer cement is often mixed up with alkali-activated slag developed since 1956 in Eastern Europe by G.V. Glukhovsky. Alkali-activation, which is generally performed with corrosive chemicals (see below User-friendly), is used for the making of concretes exclusively. The alkali-activated materials are not manufactured separately and not sold to third parties as commercial cements. On the opposite, geopolymer technology was from the start aimed at manufacturing binders and cements for various types of applications.

 

Read More

What is Fly Ash?

Posted by on Mar 8, 2016 in Materials | 0 comments

What is Fly Ash?

Fly ash is a byproduct from burning pulverized coal in electric power generating plants.

flyash1Fly ash is a byproduct from burning pulverized coal in electric power generating plants. During combustion, mineral impurities in the coal (clay, feldspar, quartz, and shale) fuse in suspension and float out of the combustion chamber with the exhaust gases. As the fused material rises, it cools and solidifies into spherical glassy particles called fly ash. Fly ash is collected from the exhaust gases by electrostatic precipitators or bag filters. The fine powder does resemble portland cement but it is chemically different. Fly ash chemically reacts with the byproduct calcium hydroxide released by the chemical reaction between cement and water to form additional cementitious products that improve many desirable properties of concrete. All fly ashes exhibit cementitious properties to varying degrees depending on the chemical and physical properties of both the fly ash and cement.

Fly ash in the mix replaces Portland Cement, producing big savings in concrete materials costs.

Fly ash is an environmentally-friendly solution that meets or exceeds performance specifications. Fly ash can contribute to LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) points.
@boxconcretemold #outoftheboxconstruction

Read More
Translate »